Many came to Open House for Fire Prevention Week

Photo by Life in Still Photograpy

Photo by Life in Still Photograpy

Photo by Life in Still Photograpy

Photo by Life in Still Photograpy

Photo by Life in Still Photograpy

Photo by Life in Still Photograpy

Photo by Life in Still Photograpy

Photo by Life in Still Photograpy

Photo by Life in Still Photograpy

Photo by Life in Still Photograpy

Photo by Life in Still Photograpy

Tuesday, Oct. 9 was a perfect evening for the Milan Area Fire Fighter’s Open House.  All ages attended, some a few weeks old were carried, some were pushed in strollers, and some rode on bikes while others walked or drove to the fire station.   What a fun way for the Fire Fighter’s to share Fire Prevention Week with the community.  Mini firefighter’s with their little red helmets were lined up to spray water out of a real fire hose, climb inside the huge shiny fire trucks or play with  Huron Valley Ambulance’s remote control “child size” talking ambulance.   As sounds of helicopters were heard overhead, crowds rushed out back to greet the Monroe County Sheriff’s Department Helicopter and the new University of Michigan’s EC155 Survival Flight Helicopter.  People gathered on each side of the helicopters to wait their turn to sit inside.

In addition to the little red fire helmets there were stickers and books instructing children how to be “fire safe”.  Fire Fighters were on hand to give tours of the trucks and equipment.  Plenty of food was available as Basil Boys, Hungry Howie’s and Marco’s rotated throughout the event donating pizzas.  Milan Bakery donated boxes of fresh donuts.  Meijer’s on Carpenter donated a gift certificate which the Fire Fighters used to purchase cider.

Thank you to the Milan Area Fire Fighter’s for volunteering their time for the Open House and an even bigger thank you for caring and protecting our lives and homes and showing us how to be “fire safe”.

This fire station has approximately 30 fire fighters, at least 2 husband and wife teams.  When these fire fighters aren’t at the fire department they have various jobs, such as homemakers, carpenters, construction and public relations.  They are not full time paid, they are “paid on call” which means they get paid for 1 meeting each month, for training and for calls.  Calls means the phone rings, they grab their gear and jump on a truck only knowing someone needs help with few additional details.  They must be dedicated to give so much of themselves to help others because if they’re washing their trucks or sweeping the fire station, cleaning gear, speaking at a school assembly, answering the phone  or greeting you at their open house…they’re volunteering, they’re doing community service, they’re caring for you.

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